Style Stories

These Florals Last Forever

Pomegranate bed linens, from the Matouk Schumacher Collection.

Every Spring, we see a proliferation of floral prints throughout the home, from stylized floral wallpapers and rugs, to brightly colored chintzes on upholstery. There may be a reason why we gravitate to these textiles: scientific studies find that humans reap numerous benefits from living amidst flowers. Notably, a 2012 study by researchers at Harvard Medical School found that people actually feel more compassionate towards others, have less worry and anxiety, and feel less depressed when flowers are present in the home. Matouk has long embraced the floral in timeless and exciting ways, through the Lulu DK for Matouk collection - styles like Charlotte and Joplin - and through our own new introductions over the years.

In the spring of 2019, we introduced Matouk prints Margot and Alexandra, which began a sort of rebirth of florals in the Matouk product line. Margot, a subtle floral pattern, originated from a textile found deep in the Matouk archives and was launched to coincide with Matouk’s 90th anniversary. Alexandra, based on a vintage Parisian find, is a bold, lively take on the floral that adds an elegant touch of whimsy to the bed. Both of these patterns reinvigorated our love for florals, and naturally, as we began an exciting new collaboration with Schumacher, florals were somewhat destined to be a part of the collection.

The Matouk Schumacher Collection unites two heritage companies synonymous with beauty and quality, and combines Matouk’s impeccably crafted linens with Schumacher’s extraordinary prints. Schumacher, having been in business since 1889, is well known for its vast collection of patterns and a tastemaker in the industry. And if you know Schumacher, you know that florals are a key part of their DNA. Dara Caponigro, creative director of Schumacher, says, “We have some floral patterns in our current portfolio that have been in our line since the early 20th century and we bring out brand new ones every January as part of our Schumacher Classics collection.” Caponigro continues, “Florals are forever appealing, how they’re used may change and the colorways may change, but a beautiful floral pattern can really stand the test of time.”

"Florals are forever appealing, how they’re used may change and the colorways may change, but a beautiful floral pattern can really stand the test of time.”

Dara Caponigro on the power of florals

Pomegranate for the Matouk Schumacher Collection in Prussian Blue, Citrus, and Pink Coral.
Our Daphne linens in Grass, Hazy Blue, Berry, and Silver.

Pomegranate, a bold floral from the Matouk Schumacher Collection, is a style we feel will do just that - stand the test of time. Based on an 18th century design from Schumacher’s archive, Pomegranate reimagines a timeless botanical in three luscious colorways: Citrus, Pink Coral, and Prussian Blue. The vibrant style is printed in Italy on our 500 thread count Luca percale and finished with the subtlest scalloped edge and white tape (the same finish as Margot). Pomegranate is a wonderful pairing of Schumacher artistry and Matouk craftsmanship, and brings a classic yet exuberant style to the Matouk line.

Another new introduction for Matouk Spring 2020 is Daphne, a versatile style that utilizes florals in a more subtle way through it’s embroidered floral vine. Daphne is special in that it originated as a multi-colored Bespoke style and has now been reintroduced into our core collection as a modern, single-color embroidery. Daphne can be quietly classic or vibrant and bold, depending on the choice of thread color. Made on our white 520 thread count Ceylon percale, each piece is finished with a knife edge and delicate white cording.

Schumacher's Pyne Hollyhock (shown in Grisaille), a favorite of Schumacher's creative director Dara Caponigro. Image Courtesy of Schumacher.

Not only do florals make a statement on the bed, but they translate beautifully to wallpaper and furniture as well. Schumacher’s textiles are perfect for these applications. Some of Caponigro’s favorites, including Pyne Hollyhock, Salisbury Chintz, and Betty Chintz by Veere Greeney, are “uber sophisticated styles that are romantic but not too sweet, and add life and beauty to a room". Personal favorites of Matouk Creative Director, Mindy Matouk, include Indian Arbre, "it is so lush and exotic, very transcendent", and Rubia Embroidery, "My favorite is the blush colorway which has the most beautiful golden threads floating on a pale peach linen. The colors and the geometry are so soothing and elegant, but the embroidered flowers are pure charm."

Schumacher's Betty Chintz in Celadon.
Schumacher's Rubia Embroidery in Blush.

Although we’ve long been a fan of florals, some rightfully find them overwhelming or too fussy. Caponigro offers some advice on how to keep florals from taking over a space, “To keep the space more modern, make sure florals are used intentionally in a room and mix them with plenty of solids like linen. If you’re going for a bang – floral upholstered walls or full length curtains – keep the rest of the room on the cleaner side. Or, try using them in a more minimal way – a single floral expertly placed – on a club chair or occasional chair – is often all it takes to add a note of lovely surprise without overdoing it.” For those who prefer a more minimalist on florals, Caponigro recommends Schumacher’s Roca Redonda in Carbon & Multi.

Schumacher's Roca Redonda in Carbon & Multi.

Perhaps one of the greatest benefits of florals is the element of cheerfulness they add to a room. During this time while we are cooped up in our homes yearning for more time outdoors, and outings with friends and family, florals, in any form, serve as a source of joy. As Caponigro explains, “They elevate our moods on the darkest days and remind us that spring is just around the corner.” Matouk agrees, "Flowers are a symbol of abundance and romance, and humans are biologically primed to associate flowers with happiness. While it would be nice to have fresh flowers in the bedroom everyday, for most people that isn't happening. Floral textiles are the perfect evergreen surrogate to lend some optimism to our environments."

"Floral textiles are the perfect evergreen surrogate to lend some optimism to our environments."

Mindy Matouk

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