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Top Décor Trends for 2015

Top Décor Trends for 2015

New year, new trends. We talked to five interior design firms to see what decor trends they predict will be most popular this year. Touching on overarching ideas like shape, color and pattern, as well as specifics like hardware, tile and lighting, some are looks you’ve likely been noticing too, and others are just beginning to emerge. Let’s have a look.

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Pieces Lydon has used in recent projects include a cerused oak credenza by Irwin Field Design for CF Modern that features hand polished nickel hardware; a white feather and nickel sconce by ABYU Lighting against a peacock blue venetian plaster wall; BDDW's Lake Armoire with graphite lacquer exterior, American holly front, blackened steel base, and bronze feet.

Katie Lydon, Katie Lydon Interiors: This year we are going to see more decor with unexpected pairings of materials. In years past, trends have leaned toward clean pared down shapes and materials. For 2015 we’ll be starting to see more furniture, lighting, and decor that re-imagines 20th century shapes with fresh, rich material choices. Expect interesting combinations of wood and metals, even metals and feathers. This creativity feels luxurious without being ostentatious. People want color and depth; this is a new way to experience that.

 

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Levin and Boswell called out these furnishings as representative of their favorite trends: tinted glass Shape Mirrors by Bower Studio available at Matter in NYC; felt armchair designed by Delphine and Reed Krakoff for Established & Sons available at Matter in NYC; Lazy Suzi rotating laminate trays by Kelly Behun from available at Suite New York.

Ali Levin + Lindsay Boswell, LABL Studio: What do we think will be hot this year? Structured upholstery and op art.

 

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Aged brass mixed with color on light fixtures by Urban Electric Co.; color-accented hardware by Emtek; painted terracotta tiles by Tabarka Studio; porcelain tiles that look like wood by Walker Zanger.

Cecilia Walker, Cecilia Walker Design: I’ve noticed a lot of trends, but I’ve narrowed it down to three. The first is hand-painted color that accents finishes on lighting, hardware, art, and tiles. It adds a layer of color and sophistication without feeling like the "pop-of-color" trend.  The second is rustic modern. While reclaimed wood and driftwood finishes have been around for almost a decade, you'll see more cerused wood mixed with other elements. The wood and stone mixes in tile mosaics are fresh and new And third is unlaquered brass; aged brass, not the shiny finishes from the 1980s. The next iteration is mixing aged brass with other metal finishes, like oil rubbed bronze, enamel, and color.

 

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Boho style bedroom designed by Jamie Meares.

Jamie Meares, Furbish Studio: I think southern boho will make a big splash this year in bright colors and bold patterns. Traditional southern staples like paisleys and ticking stripes will be mixed with global-inspired textiles like suzanis and ikat prints.

 

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An example of the woodland creature trend: Coral & Tusk’s “Peek A Wreath” embroidered artwork.

Mona Ross Berman, Mona Ross Berman Interiors: First, I think there will be continued interest in what I call the “woodland creature” look—organic and handmade, with a little early-Americana thrown in. I don’t know its origins, but the interest in “makers” and locally sourced items has likely been an influence. Second, we’ve all been so entranced by color—myself included—that I think we will see a return to black and white. Revisiting a Spartan, clean aesthetic and a more neutral palette will be part of that. It’s not cold as the 1990s Calvin Klein era, but rather edited with thoughtful touches of warmth and personality. Finally, I think clients and consumers are trending towards a look that is less monolithic and more nuanced. Everyone has access to just about everything these days and interiors will increasingly reflect that.